Indiana Jones and the Hazardous Construction Site

 


Childhood is a time of discovery. More specifically, it is a time spent trying to discover what can kill you as you explore the hazardous construction site your parents told you like half-a-dozen times to stay away from.

Construction site photo by Jamar Penny on Unsplash
It’s scientifically proven (probably) that many children of a certain age can't see danger. Or rather, they can’t see the real danger of things that can harm them, only the imaginary danger of the things that can’t.

When a group of young kids are running around the neighborhood, trying to find something to do, it’s not uncommon for them to wander into an entirely different world. In this world, adventure and mystery exists, entirely constructed in the minds of these kids. But unfortunately, that world is often built out of non-OSHA approved materials, such as boards with rusty nails in it, broken glass from abandoned buildings and, of course, poison ivy.

A massive dirt mound set on the outside of a half-built house is the perfect place for a sword fight, for example, and the random, jagged detritus that may be packed into that dirt is just a vaguely interesting obstacle that may or may not be relevant.

Here’s a comparison of actual thing vs what a child sees:


However, tell the same child it’s time to go to the dentist and suddenly you’re Jigsaw and she/he is in a race against time before they meet the most horrifying demise.

And don’t even mention the danger of dark closets at bedtime.

The point is, young people seem to be wired to self-destruct.  You can believe in Evolution all you want, but it’s a miracle that any of us survive past age 13.

Comment below on your favorite near-death experience playing as a child. 

Like this post? Check out our other articles where we wax nostalgic: 

Like to watch videos but hate to think? Check out the Jacks of no Trades videos:


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